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Great Lakes Workshop


Tuesday, June 21, 2011
Edison Boat Club – Detroit, Michigan

On June 21, 2011 the Interagency Ocean Observation Committee co-hosted a workshop with the Great Lakes Observing System to provide attendees with an understanding of Great Lakes observing systems and their uses, explore existing and emerging user needs for data and information, provide an opportunity to match use needs with observing system capability, and help to inform plans for the future enhancement of the Great Lakes Observing System.  The day began with several presentations to set the stage by putting the role of GLOS in context of national and global efforts. Additional presentations from representatives from several federal agencies provided insight into current programs that are relevant to industries.

Selected industry representatives from the agriculture, energy, wind, and water management sectors presented user-case, explaining how data is used in decision-making and identifying gaps in current data needs. Following, the larger group was broken down into smaller working groups to discuss a set of questions provided by the organizing committee. The event was supported by DTE Energy, Battelle, Sonadyne, the Council of Great Lakes Industries, Baird, Sarnia-Lambton Environmental Association, and the Michigan Farm Bureau. CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE SUMMARY REPORT.

PRESENTATIONS

Setting the Stage

Great Lakes Observing Issues

User Case Studies

SWEET SEA CHANGES: HOW GREAT LAKES OBSERVATIONS CAN WORK FOR YOU

As the largest freshwater ecosystem on Earth, the Great Lakes have a profound influence on the surrounding region providing unparalleled water resources, unique weather patterns and fertile landscapes.  Known as North America’s ‘Third Coast’ and the ‘Sweet Seas,’ the Great Lakes are an important source of freshwater for domestic, industrial and agricultural use; serve as a regional highway for trade; and support world class recreational uses.  Great Lakes basin water resources support industrial activities, urban populations, rural communities and agriculture; and provide ecosystem services needed to support aquatic and terrestrial species. The region also holds potential as a location for exploiting renewable energy through harnessing the winds that blow over it for much of the year.

The realization of the many benefits that the Great Lakes can provide depends on observing and monitoring these resources. Great Lakes observations are made by many federal, state, and nongovernmental organizations, as well as by private companies. Many of these observations and data resources are being brought together by the Great Lakes Observing System – an integral part of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System. These data, and the forecasts and predictions made from them, are a critical resource for managing the sustainable Satellite Photouse of Great Lakes resources as well as contributing to understanding the role of the Lakes in weather and climate.

With a focus on energy and water utilities, marine operations and agriculture, the workshop provided attendees with an understanding of Great Lakes observing systems and their uses; will explore existing and emerging user needs for data and information; an opportunity to match user needs with observing system capability, and helped to inform plans for the future enhancement of the Great Lakes Observing System.

For more information  contact Jennifer Read, Executive Director of the Great Lakes Observing System, jread@glos.us , 734-332-6101.

 

Great Lakes